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JavaScript Number Properties

Numbers are one of the most fundamental data types in JavaScript. They can be used to represent a wide variety of values, from simple integers to complex floating-point numbers. JavaScript also provides a number of built-in properties that can be used to manipulate and query numbers.

Standard Number Properties

The following table lists the standard Number properties:

PropertyDescription
EPSILONThe smallest positive number that can be represented accurately by JavaScript.
MAX_SAFE_INTEGERThe largest integer that can be represented accurately by JavaScript without losing precision.
MAX_VALUEThe largest possible numeric value that can be represented by JavaScript.
MIN_SAFE_INTEGERThe smallest integer that can be represented accurately by JavaScript without losing precision.
MIN_VALUEThe smallest possible numeric value that can be represented by JavaScript.
NaNThe special value “Not a Number”.
NEGATIVE_INFINITYThe special value “Negative Infinity”.
POSITIVE_INFINITYThe special value “Positive Infinity”.

These properties can be accessed using the Number object. For example, to get the largest possible numeric value that can be represented by JavaScript, you would use the following code:

const maxValue = Number.MAX_VALUE;

Using Number Properties

The standard Number properties can be used in a variety of ways. For example, you can use them to check whether a number is within a certain range, or to convert a number to a different format.

Here are a few examples:

// Check if a number is within the range of safe integers.
const isSafeInteger = (number) => {
return number >= Number.MIN_SAFE_INTEGER && number <= Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER;
};
// Convert a number to exponential notation.
const toExponential = (number) => {
return number.toExponential();
};
// Convert a number to a string with two decimal places.
const toFixed = (number) => {
return number.toFixed(2);
};

Other Number Properties

In addition to the standard Number properties, there are a number of other Number properties that can be used to manipulate and query numbers. These properties are defined on the Number.prototype object.

For example, the Number.prototype.isFinite() method can be used to check whether a number is a finite number. The Number.prototype.isNaN() method can be used to check whether a number is the special value NaN.

Here are a few examples:

// Check if a number is a finite number.
const isFinite = (number) => {
return number.isFinite();
};

// Check if a number is the special value NaN.
const isNaN = (number) => {
return number.isNaN();
};
// Get the absolute value of a number.
const abs = (number) =>; {
return Math.abs(number);
};

Conclusion

JavaScript Number properties provide a variety of ways to manipulate and query numbers. By understanding how to use these properties, you can write more efficient and robust JavaScript code.